The Surprising Truth About What Motivates People Ross | May 28th, 2010

I found this talk (and video) fascinating and wanted to share it with you. The speaker, Daniel Pink, authored four books about the changing world of work (two of the books – A Whole New Mind and Drive – are New York Times bestsellers). Dan recently spoke at the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) about motivation and his latest book (Drive). RSA subsequently created a unique, visually rich video of the talk (below).

This video is notable for several reasons. First, it’s remarkable for its creativity. The visuals move fast, but are easy to follow and nicely support the narrative. More importantly, the video reveals surprising truths about what motivates people.

The video is just under 11 minutes long – and well worth your time to watch.

Are you surprised by what you heard in the video? Do you agree?

If you’re interested, here’s Dan’s talk from TED (last year) (thanks to Ferg for the link – in the comments):

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  • Ferg

    besides Dan Pinks work see his ted talk here – http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/dan_pink_on_motivation.html

    Awesome piece of animation

  • Ferg

    besides Dan Pinks work see his ted talk here – http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/dan_pink_on_motivation.html

    Awesome piece of animation

  • glamaz0n

    I love the animation but I can’t help noticing that of course the agenda fits with the cS business model.

    Do highly skilled, challenging work for FREE!!!!

  • glamaz0n

    I love the animation but I can’t help noticing that of course the agenda fits with the cS business model.

    Do highly skilled, challenging work for FREE!!!!

  • rachelstene

    glam, I totally agree!

    I have heard this theory before but would like to stress that money for conceptual work does matter up to a point. We have to make ends meet first! Our work here is devalued to the point of killing our profession with the refund policy, which also leaves buyers unmotivated to leave feedback.

    Once I have been paid enough, I can totally relate to not being motivated by more money. That may look like being really motivated to do one large job really well, if it’s my only job for the month and how I’m going to pay the bills! Or, lots of little jobs well, but either way, I stop taking on more work once I have enough to make ends meet, then I just focus on what I want! (which is nice having that option as a freelancer!)

    As far as the animation goes, as an animator, I like the creative drawing, but I am rather sickened by the constant choppiness of the hand moving in and out, and all around the frame for 11 minutes straight! The brain catches on to the set up pretty quickly so you don’t have to actually show the hand drawing every single picture in fast motion to get the idea across. You could just show the hand in the frame and then move it out! Try it some time and your audience won’t be running for little brown paper bags!

  • rachelstene

    glam, I totally agree!

    I have heard this theory before but would like to stress that money for conceptual work does matter up to a point. We have to make ends meet first! Our work here is devalued to the point of killing our profession with the refund policy, which also leaves buyers unmotivated to leave feedback.

    Once I have been paid enough, I can totally relate to not being motivated by more money. That may look like being really motivated to do one large job really well, if it’s my only job for the month and how I’m going to pay the bills! Or, lots of little jobs well, but either way, I stop taking on more work once I have enough to make ends meet, then I just focus on what I want! (which is nice having that option as a freelancer!)

    As far as the animation goes, as an animator, I like the creative drawing, but I am rather sickened by the constant choppiness of the hand moving in and out, and all around the frame for 11 minutes straight! The brain catches on to the set up pretty quickly so you don’t have to actually show the hand drawing every single picture in fast motion to get the idea across. You could just show the hand in the frame and then move it out! Try it some time and your audience won’t be running for little brown paper bags!

  • Dragan Loncar

    I’m just wondering what the Bilderberg group has to say on this one…

  • Dragan Loncar

    I’m just wondering what the Bilderberg group has to say on this one…

  • Suzelaforgia

    I think this animations is very very cool. I wonder how long it took. I did notice a few transcription guffs.

  • Suzelaforgia

    I think this animations is very very cool. I wonder how long it took. I did notice a few transcription guffs.

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