10 things Entrepreneurs Can Learn From Coach Mike | November 11th, 2013

I am not the biggest of sports fans, but I do love watching a great team from just about any sport working together as a unit. The beauty of an powerful individual performance, wrapped in the cohesion of great team work is a thing of wonder and a treasure to behold. The grace, power, and skill of athletes at just about any level is something people from across cultures are taught to admire, but behind those performances is one person responsible for pushing, prodding, organizing, teaching, praising, criticizing, and motivating: Coach. It is Coach is the designer and keeper of the system; prioritizer of strategy and goals; and organizer of the details. It is Coach who leads, inspires, builds, and molds a team into success. Sound familiar? If you are an entrepreneur it sure should, because these are the core skills and responsibilities of an entrepreneur, too.

Coaches, the great as well as the less-than-great, can have an enormous influence over the ives of their players. Think back to just about any childhood and there is an excellent chance that Coach played a significant role in the development of that child, whether through a single play in a single game, or through a long season of hard work and effort. Entrepreneurs may not have the same influence over their team’s lives, but they can still seek to develop talent, teach skills, inspire performance, and set expectations for excellence. Here are 10 things that entrepreneurs can learn from Coach:

1. Coach coaches. Actively.
Coach spends a great deal of time teaching, guiding, and giving direct instruction to the players. Everything from basic skills, to strategy, to the specific plays that were designed for the game. Entrepreneurs also can take the role of teacher and help to instruct their teams in the strategies and tactics used in the business.

2. Coach delegates.
Good coaches understand how to divide the work amongst their staff. Typically a coaching team will have an offensive coordinator and well as a defensive coordinator, and Coach will give each primary responsibilities. This does not mean that Coach isn’t involved, but rather that he recognizes how the other coaches can contribute. Assistants, whether a team parent or team manager are given responsibilities.

3. Coach inspires.
We all know the old trope of the locker room speech at half time. Well, old tropes are grounded in truth. One of the  most important things a coach can do is inspire people to work harder and constantly improve. For entrepreneurs this is equally important – remember your team looks to you for guidance and leadership and inspiring them to give their best is a critical part of the job.

4. Coach set expectations.
A good coach expects a great deal from her players and she will let them know this every single day. Coach always expects players to give their all, perform at the highest level, and succeed. But it is not just on the field that expectations are set: Coach also expects her players to accept responsibility for their own actions, be respectful of their teammates as well as the opposing team. accept the judgement of the officials, and come prepared to work hard every day and improve constantly.

5. Coach builds teams.
Building a strong and cohesive team is the most important single aspect of coaching. Great coaches build character through rewarding positive behavior, correcting poor performance, and providing experiences for the players but they also build it by teaching players to work together, defend one another, and achieve common goals. Coaches will also encourage their players to support one another and praise each other’s hard work, yet still make it clear that they have a responsibility to the entire team and that each of them must count on the others.

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Twitter Link Roundup #201 – Small Business, Startups, Innovation, Social Media, Design, Marketing and More Ross | November 8th, 2013

Every day on the crowdSPRING Twitter account and on my own Twitter account, I post links to posts or videos I enjoyed reading or viewing. These posts and videos are about logo design, web design, startups, entrepreneurship, small business, leadership, social media, marketing, and more! Can you believe this is Roundup number 200!?!? Here are some of the links that I’ve liked and shared this past week!

Virgin America has always done things differently. Here’s a phenomenally creative new airline safety video from Virgin – it’s unlike anything you’ve seen on other airlines, except maybe the videos from Air New Zealand, including their latest video with Betty White.

smallbusinessblog

Customer Service and a Culture of Helping - crowdspring.co/1cGIiqr

Empower Your Small Business: what entrepreneurs can learn from zombies, is Facebook marketing a failure? -crowdspring.co/1cSkCiT

Commuting’s Hidden Cost | NYT - crowdspring.co/1aEAXIs

The Entrepreneur’s Guide To Surviving The Startup Zombie Apocalypse - crowdspring.co/1cEi6AC

PayPal waives $50,000 of payment fees for startups - crowdspring.co/1aMufA2

Why You Really Should Move Quickly to Get Rid of Bad Hires - crowdspring.co/1hIeNIz

I value crowdsoucring for all kind of things, including design. Here’s why – goo.gl/vA7zaO

Great Culture: Smart Firing Is as Key as Smart Hiring - crowdspring.co/HECmEA

Here’s a Thought: Trust Your Employees and Throw Away the Clock | New Media Leaders – crowdspring.co/1cMRoBW

startupsblog

The Entrepreneur’s Guide To Surviving The Startup Zombie Apocalypse - crowdspring.co/1cEi6AC

Customer Service and a Culture of Helping - crowdspring.co/1cGIiqr

15 Inspirational Books For Entrepreneurs |Entrepreneur - crowdspring.co/1hJWdQ5

17 Most Effective Examples Of Startup Landing Pages - crowdspring.co/1aYaSnW

Why You Really Should Move Quickly to Get Rid of Bad Hires - crowdspring.co/1hIeNIz

Why Open-Office Layouts Are Bad For Employees, Bosses, And Productivity | Fast Company - crowdspring.co/1aYgfTU

PayPal waives $50,000 of payment fees for startups - crowdspring.co/1aMufA2

When a great product hits the funding crunch | by Andrew Chen - crowdspring.co/1cSM6oq

I value crowdsourcing for all kind of things, including design. Here’s why: goo.gl/vA7zaO

Out of the picture: why the world’s best photo startup is going out of business | The Verge – crowdspring.co/18WQJd9

Great Culture: Smart Firing Is as Key as Smart Hiring - crowdspring.co/HECmEA

How to gracefully wind down a failing startup | The Next Web - crowdspring.co/18WPMl5

How Can a CEO Lead Social Media Efforts for Their Company? – crowdspring.co/1hIf91J

Here’s a Thought: Trust Your Employees and Throw Away the Clock | New Media Leaders – crowdspring.co/1cMRoBW

40 Remarkable Homepages from New Startups | SpyreStudios - crowdspring.co/1b6Tie2

Commuting’s Hidden Cost | NYT - crowdspring.co/1aEAXIs

socialmediablog

The Golden Age of Ad Tech or Peak Advertising? | Digiday – crowdspring.co/1hIemxM

54% Of Digital Ads Aren’t Viewable, And Even ‘Viewability’ Is In A Black Box - crowdspring.co/1hIgPIC

How Can a CEO Lead Social Media Efforts for Their Company? – crowdspring.co/1hIf91J

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The Entrepreneur’s Guide To Surviving The Startup Zombie Apocalypse Ross | November 6th, 2013

walkingdead

I’m a fan of The Walking Dead, a U.S. cable television series about surviving a zombie-infested world.

What can entrepreneurs learn from a television show that features mindless, reanimated corpses with an insatiable hunger for human flesh? Surprisingly, there is much to learn.

Here are ten fundamental lessons entrepreneurs can learn from the zombie apocalypse:

1. Indecision and inaction is paralyzing and leads to failure. Throughout the first two seasons of the series, the group’s leader, Rick Grimes, is, at times, indecisive. His decision paralysis eventually costs many lives and threatens his group’s survival.

Indecision can be fatal to startups. In fact, indecision and inaction can harm a company far more than making the wrong decision. This is true for leaders and is also true for every member of your team. At crowdSPRING, we don’t hire people for any position unless we believe they are comfortable and capable to make decisions on their own. Encourage people to start with small steps and small decisions, and build from there. The first step, no matter how small, is crucial to success.

Indecisiveness can impact even the largest companies. Microsoft sat on the fence and missed the shift to mobile computing. It now is paying dearly for that indecisiveness through it’s inability to gain a strong foothold in the mobile space. Polaroid and Eastman Kodak debated the merits of digital camera technology and while they debated, the technology buried them. The most relevant current example is Blackberry, which did nothing while its core market was swallowed by Apple and Google. Today, Blackberry is no less a zombie than the reanimated corpses in the TV show.

2. Celebrate small wins. In one of the episodes of the Walking Dead, a small group of people finds an abandoned prison after numerous deadly encounters with zombies. The group’s leader wants everyone to conserve their energy to focus on finding food and ammunition the next day, but his wife compellingly argues that the group should enjoy their small victory because it would motivate them for the challenges yet to come.

That was good advice. It’s very important to stay focused, but many entrepreneurs forget that it’s also extremely important for startup teams to celebrate incremental success. Incremental success builds on itself and encourages people to work hard to achieve the next milestone.

3. Focus. If you’ve watched any movie of show about zombies, you know that zombies are commonly shown mindlessly wandering until they find human flesh, and at that point, reaching and eating that flesh becomes their sole and absolute focus.

Many entrepreneurs suffer from a similar problem. Many entrepreneurs sleepwalk through their ideas without passion or focus, waiting for months and sometimes years to get started. Focus will be the difference between success and failure. Find an idea that drives your passion, and get started! Incidentally, if you have trouble maintaining your focus, consider using checklists – they work remarkably well.

4. Simple solutions can solve difficult problems. In the show, people often encounter large groups of zombies. Even when well-armed, it’s dangerous to start shooting zombies because the noise will simply attract more zombies. Instead, people must use simple weapons like screwdrivers, bats, axes, knives and other improvised tools.

An analogous lesson holds true for entrepreneurs. Sometimes, when faced with a challenging problem, our instinct is to look for a complex solution that might require a lot of time and effort. Often, we can solve the same challenging problem with a much simpler solution. For example, instead of waiting years to raise millions of dollars to launch your new startup, consider how you can launch for under $1,500.

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Customer Service and a Culture of Helping Mike | November 4th, 2013

“Thanks for contacting us with your question.  We’ll reply within 3 business days.”

When people discuss the “helping” careers, they are usually referring to honorable fields such as social work, teaching, and psychotherapy. Rarely does selling shoes come into the mix. Yet Zappos has built an online empire, growing in little more than a dozen years into one of the largest retailers of shoes in the world. How did they do it? By helping people. Helping people to solve their problems. Helping people to get the best fit. Helping people to use the product. Helping people to make an everyday activity enjoyable, productive, and easy.  Mostly by recognizing that businesses don’t exist just to make a profit, but exist to solve people’s problems.

Many businesses small and large neglect customer service in their business operations. Sadly, responses such as the one above (3 days? Seriously? Just to answer a simple question?) are more the norm than the exception and when a company answers a customer like that they are missing the opportunity to build a relationship, seal a deal, delight a customer, and create positive word of mouth. The trick is to build a company culture that values and celebrates customer service.

Here are 10 things to consider as you build a culture of helping:

1. Make it easy.
Helping your customers every day in every way starts with making it easy for them to reach you. If you have a website, prominently display your phone number, your email address, or a link to a support request form. Use your social media platforms to deliver, and let your followers know that they can always reach you through Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or whatever platforms you prefer. Think of every possible way that someone might want to reach you and do it: install a chat service for those who like to type in real time; have a toll-free phone number (crowdSPRING is 877.887.7442 – put that on your speed dial today!) and extend your phone hours for as long as possible; keep the email address for your customer support simple as pie (support@crowdspring.com); make your webform stupid-simple and so easy a 3rd grader can use it; monitor your Facebook and Twitter so you know immediately if someone contacts you there.

2. Don’t keep ‘em waiting.
Is there anything more frustrating than sitting on hold or waiting for a response to your email when you have a problem you really want to solve? It is critical that you respond quickly when someone reaches out. Measure your response time in minutes or hours, not days and you will have gotten off to a good start. Better still, pick up the phone on the 2nd ring, answer that email while it is still hot from the oven, type that chat greeting before the ink is dry and you are on your way to putting a smile on your customer’s face.

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Twitter Link Roundup #200 – Small Business, Startups, Innovation, Social Media, Design, Marketing and More Ross | November 1st, 2013

Every day on the crowdSPRING Twitter account and on my own Twitter account, I post links to posts or videos I enjoyed reading or viewing. These posts and videos are about logo design, web design, startups, entrepreneurship, small business, leadership, social media, marketing, and more! Can you believe this is Roundup number 200!?!? Here are some of the links that I’ve liked and shared this past week!

Do you still use business cards for your business? The above video is a funny look at how some people feel about business cards.

smallbusinessblog

Is Small Business Marketing On Facebook A Complete Failure? - crowdspring.co/1aWQct4

Repeat Your Successes, Not Your Failures. Failure Is Overrated – fi.co/posts/2441

Small Business and Startups: The Trends for 2014 (Pt II) - crowdspring.co/1atXci8

7 Ways to Make Your Business Card Your Best Marketing Tool – entm.ag/12oQZzW

The psychology of a penny when setting prices - crowdspring.co/1h0RYQ2

Why Small Businesses Are Building Remote Workforces | Business Insider - crowdspring.co/1aHHoaf

Good whitepaper on advertising measurement metrics | by Ben Kunz – crowdspring.co/HsVIMR

Qualities Of Truly Great Employees | Business Insider by Dharmesh Shah - crowdspring.co/1h0QmFY

ask employees for feedback instead of waiting for them to come to you -crowdspring.co/1akonho

Perfect employees don’t exist. Hire for potential, says Jason Fried of 37signals - crowdspring.co/1aHHrTp

How to Design a Website that People Trust - crowdspring.co/1bPcyPf

startupsblog

Repeat Your Successes, Not Your Failures. Failure Is Overrated – fi.co/posts/2441

Qualities Of Truly Great Employees | Business Insider by Dharmesh Shah - crowdspring.co/1h0QmFY

7 Ways to Make Your Business Card Your Best Marketing Tool – entm.ag/12oQZzW

Good whitepaper on advertising measurement metrics | by Ben Kunz – crowdspring.co/HsVIMR

Commuting’s Hidden Cost | NYT - crowdspring.co/1aR15fY

The psychology of a penny when setting prices - crowdspring.co/1h0RYQ2

Small Business and Startups: The Trends for 2014 (Pt II) - crowdspring.co/1atXci8

A VC: The Role Of Personal Chemistry In Investment Selection | by Fred Wilson - crowdspring.co/HujUhY

Amazon and the “profitless business model” fallacy – crowdspring.co/1aQZQ04

The Strengths and Weaknesses of Your Leadership Style | Entrepreneur by Gwen Moran – crowdspring.co/1ccCc0G

Entrepreneur PSA – Advertising Businesses are Hard | Seth’s Blog - crowdspring.co/1aHHgHS

What The Highest Converting Websites Do Differently - crowdspring.co/1aR0avM

Don’t pay lip service to customer service | USA Today - crowdspring.co/1ioAoDm

Perfect employees don’t exist. Hire for potential - crowdspring.co/1aHHrTp

The Pricing Model That Increased Our Free Trial Signups by 358% (and Revenue by 25%) – crowdspring.co/1alarDV

Uber — What’s Fueling Uber’s Growth Engine? | GrowthHackers - crowdspring.co/1akvc2y

“Hey, Marissa Mayer, You’ve Got it Wrong: Telecommuting Isn’t A Bad Thing. It’s The Future” – crowdspring.co/1c1aJij

11 Ways Big Companies Undermine Innovation | Scott Kirsner – Harvard Business Review – crowdspring.co/1aksObQ

How to Build Culture in a Remote Team | Zapier - crowdspring.co/HeUEfz

The Unexpected Compensation Trends of Post-Series A Startup Founder/CEOs – crowdspring.co/1iu3ukT

“Work is not the enemy we’re trying to outrun.” A New Workplace Manifesto - crowdspring.co/HqrjhY

Nice piece on @starterschool and how it is changing the way people think about education – crowdspring.co/1crIrSq

Why the Midwest is better for startups than saturated Silicon Valley | VentureBeat - crowdspring.co/1akquBC

“Life’s too short, and high tech moves too fast, to mess about with mediocrity.” – crowdspring.co/1adCqDi

How To Create A Culture Of ‘Shameless Honesty’ | OPEN Forum - crowdspring.co/HeVIAe

The Part They Don’t Tell You About Startup Team Building - crowdspring.co/1h0Qw02

ask employees for feedback instead of waiting for them to come to you – crowdspring.co/1akonho

Pinterest is a good idea & well executed. But a nearly $4 billion valuation? Nuts - crowdspring.co/1akpXj7

socialmediablog

Is Small Business Marketing On Facebook A Complete Failure? - crowdspring.co/1aWQct4

What The Highest Converting Websites Do Differently - crowdspring.co/1aR0avM

Good whitepaper on advertising measurement metrics – crowdspring.co/HsVIMR

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Is Small Business Marketing On Facebook A Complete Failure? Ross | October 31st, 2013

Earlier this week, Nate Elliot, a vice president and principal analyst at Forrester (a respected research firm), wrote an open letter to Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Mr. Zuckerberg:

Facebook is failing marketers.

I know this statement sounds remarkable, perhaps even unbelievable. After all, you offer marketers access to the largest audience in media history and you know a remarkable amount about each of your users. As a result nearly every large company now markets on Facebook. Last year your company collected more than $4 billion in advertising revenues.

But while lots of marketers spend lots of money on Facebook today, relatively few find success. In August, Forrester surveyed 395 marketers and eBusiness executives at large companies across the US, Canada and the UK — and these executives told us that Facebook creates less business value than any other digital marketing opportunity.

According to Forrester, Facebook came in last out of 13  online marketing strategies and sites.

facebook-failure

Elliot’s criticisms were met with a strong response from Facebook and other media outlets. Facebook replied:

the conclusions in this report are at times illogical and at others irresponsible. The reality is that Facebook advertising works. That’s why we have more than a million active advertisers including all of the Ad Age100.

Facebook is right to question the survey methodology in the Forrester report. Too much for what is passed-off as “research” today is poorly developed, poorly defined, and poorly executed.

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Small Business and Startups: The Trends for 2014 (Pt II) Mike | October 28th, 2013

I started a couple of weeks ago with the first part of a post on small business trends for 2014; today I have 5 more trends that I’d like to share. Two things to note: first, crystal balls like this one populate the Internet and mine is no better or worse than the many others out there. Secondly, trends are trends and nothing more. Some of them have legs and will be with us for a long time, others are like vapor – these may be in vogue at this moment in time, but a trend today is a mere memory to business owners a year from now. Having said that, these may inform how you approach your business in the next 12 months; here ya go:

1. Outsourcing social media. Many small business owners are devoting a significant chunk of their capacity to social media marketing, albeit sometimes with limited results. Studies have shown over 60% of small business marketers devote as much as 10 hours per week to SM campaigns and tactics. 25% of a marketer’s capacity is a huge investment by any measure and outsourcing the effort starts to look attractive to many managers and many have hired outside consultants to help. In fact, 15% of them are outsourcing design and development of their SM campaigns, 11% using outside capacity to create content and 10% are outsourcing their social media analytics. By outsourcing managers can free up their time, leverage expert help, and create brand value. Beware, however, a loss of control over messaging, increased costs, and poor integration with your other marketing efforts.

2. Crowdfunding for startup companies Great news, everyone! Recently the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed new rules to govern the upcoming changes in equity crowdfunding for startups and small businesses. The new rulers would permit startups to raise as much as $1 million from don rows online. It’s about time! In the several years since the launch of sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, filmmakers, artists and charities have used the Internet to gather support for their undertakings with huge success. But small businesses have been unable to take advantage of this innovative approach. The proposed rules are quite similar to those originally approved in the JOBS Act legislation passed last year:

  • Startups cannot raise more than $1 million in any 12-month period.
  • Investors with annual incomes or a net worth below $100,000 can only invest $2,000 or 5% of their annual income or net worth, whichever is higher
  • Investors with annual incomes or a net worth above $100,000 can only invest up to 10% of that annual income or net worth.
  • Transactions must be conducted through an intermediary. Intermediaries include registered brokers, or as a new type of entity called a “funding portal.”

For small investors the payoff could be huge (imagine investing a modest amount for a piece of a company that could go on to become the next Facebook or Twitter), but the risks are even greater. Studies have shown that startups fail at a rate between 75% and 90%, so the risk to this new breed of small-time equity investors is real and it is critical that they be well-informed. The proposed rules seek to mitigate that risk through the income and overall investment limitations.

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Leaving the past where it belongs Adriano | October 25th, 2013

Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.

John F. Kennedy

 

We know some people will feel somewhat nostalgic by having to leave their blue screens of death, frozen web browsers and broken websites behind. What once was considered standard, is now a mere blip in the traffic radar. Yes, I am talking about the Internet Explorer. More specifically, versions 8.0 and 9.0.

There are several reasons why you should consider upgrading your environment if you haven’t yet. By upgrading, you make sure your system is safer, runs faster and supports more features. Even Microsoft itself have once recognized the dangers of maintaining an outdated web browser for too long. So, if you happen to be running Internet Explorer 8 or 9, it is time to do that upgrade!

For crowdSPRING, and most complex websites, supporting all versions of Internet Explorer is expensive and tedious. Wouldn’t you prefer that we invest more of our time making more awesome features that you could use to make more money or find the perfect design you’ve been looking for? Yes, I knew you’d prefer that too! For that reason, we’re discontinuing support to Internet Explorer 8 effective immediately. For users of the version 9, beware: you’ll see a modal suggesting you to upgrade but we’ll still support it for a few more months.

PS: Most companies are following this trend, and if you didn’t know, Google is discontinuing support for IE 8 too.

12 Questions: Meet Bojan Bundalo (Bosnia and Herzegovina) Audree | October 22nd, 2013

In our 12 Questions blog series, we feature interviews with someone from the crowdSPRING community. For these interviews, we pick people who add value to our community – in the blog, in the forums, in the projects. Plainly – activities that make crowdSPRING a better community. Be professional, treat others with respect, help us build something very special, and we’ll take notice.

We’re very proud to feature Bojan Bundalo (crowdSPRING username: BigBaldBeardo) today. Bojan lives and works in Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Avatar_003

1. Please tell us about yourself.
Hello all! It’s nice to have this opportunity to present my work to crowdSPRING design community.

My name is Bojan Bundalo (33), cS “code name” BigBaldBeardo. Started using this username as a joke, but it kinda stuck with me,…you can say I’ve accidentally made a brand out of my head, but down side to thi0004s, is that shaving beard, or growing hair would be considered complete re-branding.

I’m based with my creative studio in City of Banja Luka, Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina, small country located in western Balkans. You all probably know about Bosnia from the war that took place here 20 years ago, but there’s another side of this beautiful piece of land, that should be more in the focus this time. Inspiring nature and its position on the roads between Austria and Italy in north-west, and Greece and Turkey in south-east (German, Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman culture), made this area rich in various influences, specially in fields of art and design. I’m no exception to this rule, as you’ll see from the works presented here.

After this short initial introduction and “global positioning”, that needed to be done, I can continue with shameless self promotion! :)

So, I didn’t start as graphic designer, but painting and architectural design were my first picks. After learning some basics in these fields, I’ve decided to take short brake, that extended into two years working as a sailor on Pacific coast of United States and Mexico. American tour made even more influence on the work I do today. After returning home, I’ve opened small art workshop, with selling gallery, specialized in creating classic and wood-intarsed orthodox icons. Few years after that, I’ve taken interest in 3D modeling and animation, so I did some exploration in those fields as well, as significant parts of architectural and product design visualization. Illustration led me to discover all the positive aspects of graphic design, specially logo design/visual identities/branding.

All these explorations in the past resulted in creating one place, rounding up my entire creative activity today – BigBaldBeardos_design and modeling studio (www.bigbaldbeardos.com).

2. How did you become interested in design?
When you say “design”, my first thought is architectural, product, and in the end – graphic design. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not underestimating graphic design,…on contrary.

As most of the creatives here, I’ve started doodling as a kid. Playing with shapes, forms and colors led me to drawing and painting, after that to more sculptural/3D forms of art, like product and architectural design. When you’re long enough in these fields, you’re bound to encounter something called “total design”. This involves taking care of details on some product, interior, or exterior space, and this is where graphic design in modern world of competitive markets, kicks in,…you just can’t ignore logo that is suppose to cover 1/3 of the product you need to design, or store front, that has logo covering 1/4 of its entire surface. Colors and shapes of previously formed visual identities/brands, more than often, have great impact on final creation in areas of architectural and product design, and I guess this is the point of my initially serious contact with graphic design.

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Interface Improvements: Updated buyer tools Chris | October 21st, 2013

Here at the crowdSPRING home office, we are constantly striving to improve our service. One way is to make our site easier and/or better for our users. Buyers (and creatives) are always giving us suggestions for new features or changes we can make to the tools we give them to manage their projects. Today we are launching 1 new feature and updating a few existing tools.

1) Batch scoring and feedback in project galleries.
Possibly the most important action a buyer can take in their project is to give feedback. Scoring entries and adding comments goes a long way to getting a design, name or content they’ll love. To make this easier we’ve added a way to score and comment on multiple entries at the same time. Buyers will now see an Advanced Tools button in their project gallery which will reveal the batch scoring and feedback buttons, as well as a blue corner flag over each entry which they can use to select multiple entries.

gallery-batch-tools

Once they click Batch Score Entries or Leave Batch Feedback, a dialog will pop-up showing the entries they selected, along with our standard star scoring input and a comment field. Upon Submit, the score and comment they’ve entered will be added to all of the selected entries. We hope this will not only make it easier for buyers to give feedback, but also be a big time saver.

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