5 Things Entrepreneurs Can Learn From Slopestyle Mike | February 10th, 2014

The opening of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi is a great opportunity to think about competition, performance, and creativity. Winter athletes dazzle us with their skill and endurance, and amaze us with their ability to perform under intense pressure. This isn’t the first time I have written about the Olympics, but  the debut of a new event this year drew my attention, not just for the astonishing visuals, but for the risks and drama involved. As opposed to the Halfpipe competition that we are familiar with, Slopestyle snowboarding takes place in “Terrain Parks” which are special runs that contain jumps, rails, and other obstacles the boarders use to launch themselves into the air. Slopestyle runs are judged on the difficulty of the tricks being executed, the vertical height achieved, and the overall execution of the run. Athletes can repeat tricks during each run and judges look for consistency as well as degree of difficulty.

Slopestyle has been generating some controversy in the past few weeks. Several top snowboarders have been injured during practice runs and Shaun White, the perennial leader in snowboarding events pulled out of the Slopestyle competition in order to “focus solely on trying to bring home the third straight gold medal in halfpipe…” The news media, however, was focused on the risks involved and have speculated that White withdrew because of concerns about the safety of the course.

All of that is simply a distraction from what is the most important aspect of the Slopestyle competition, namely “What does this mean to entrepreneurs, small business managers, and startup founders!” Today let’s consider these wonderful athletes and this exciting new event in the context that matters to us – here are 5 things we can learn from Slopestyle!

1. Skills. Like managing a business, Slopestyle takes a certain minimum level of skill and competence in order to compete. Snowboarders have to be adept at balance, flight, flexibility, to represent their country in international competition, let alone to be up their on the podium receiving a medal at the end of the process. Entrepreneurs and managers have to understand basics of marketing, finance, logistics, customer psychology, and human resources in order to operate their businesses, let alone compete successfully in their market. Both take practice, the ability to learn from mistakes, and repetition over time to perfect. The takeaway for entrepreneurs is that they need to take the time to develop the requisite skills and then practice and perfect.

2. Originality. When it comes to startups, we know it is the idea that counts. It needs to be original, it needs to be tested, and it needs to solve a problem or meet a market need. Same with Slopestyle. The athletes performing in this event have to differentiate themselves from the competition and this is done by creating original tricks and moves that no one else can imitate or execute as skillfully. Snowboarders often steal each other’s tricks, but when they do it becomes about who can perform that kicker, stalefish or roast beef to perfection. Businesses, too, do not always have to be launched with a completely original idea, but if a new entrant in an existing market hopes to gain share, they had better make up for the lack of originality with a more perfect execution. 

Read the rest of this post »

Twitter Link Roundup #210 – Small Business, Startups, Innovation, Social Media, Design, Marketing and More Ross | February 7th, 2014

penguins

Every day on the crowdSPRING Twitter account and on my own Twitter account, I post links to posts or videos I enjoyed reading or viewing. These posts and videos are about logo design, web design, startups, entrepreneurship, small business, leadership, social media, marketing, and more! Here are some of the links that I’ve liked and shared this past week!

The image above would be a perfect Holiday card photo for a family of penguins.

smallbusinessblog

Small Business and Startups: 5 Tips For Keeping the Books – crowdspring.co/1f1zOfD

You Can’t Beat Habit – crowdspring.co/1dlSylX

4 Steps to Starting a Web Business Without Knowing Coding | The Next Web – crowdspring.co/1ep8F6R

startupsblog

A special report from The Economist on Tech Startups. Here’s the full PDF – crowdspring.co/1cNY3hP

Small Business and Startups: 5 Tips For Keeping the Books – crowdspring.co/1f1zOfD

21 Reasons To Bootstrap Your Startup | ZoomShift – crowdspring.co/M5SXUd

The mobile future of variable pricing | ThoughtGadgets by Ben Kunz – crowdspring.co/1epd89z

Good perspective fon how long it takes for entrepreneur to know if their idea might succeed – crowdspring.co/1cNRjk2

Books that Shape Common Early Stage (Startup) Culture – crowdspring.co/1fLefAN

Weird interview questions don’t predict success, but companies still ask | Fast Company – crowdspring.co/1f35ml8

The Most Valuable Lesson I’ve Learned as a CEO | LinkedIn by Jeff Weiner – crowdspring.co/1cNXgxc

The Founders Guide to Surviving Startup Life – crowdspring.co/1eYfYis

What Games Are: Flappy Bird, Patterns And Context | TechCrunch – crowdspring.co/1dmNVbo

The Complete Quantitative Guide To Judging Your Startup | TechCrunch – crowdspring.co/1gBDzfA

Microsoft, Past and Future | by Gruber – crowdspring.co/1fQMMx3

Amazon is surprisingly quiet/inactive when it comes to acquisitions | Re/code – crowdspring.co/1dhwOrm

What’s up with the Series A? – crowdspring.co/1fkwYB1

5 reasons why battery innovation is hard for Silicon Valley – crowdspring.co/1fLbWNv

Raising Seed Capital – crowdspring.co/MX18CE

“About three-quarters of venture-backed firms in the U.S. don’t return investors’ capital” – crowdspring.co/1dhuwIO

Entrepreneurs Among Happiest People In The World, Except In The U.S. | OPEN Forum – crowdspring.co/1f7YIKA

Startup founder salaries: Younger, more inexperienced entrepreneurs pay themselves less | The Next Web – crowdspring.co/1f87xE1

What I Would Look for When Choosing a VC – Knowing What I Know Now? – crowdspring.co/1f7WXgp

4 Steps to Starting a Web Business Without Knowing Coding – crowdspring.co/1ep8F6R

Why Chicago needs to stop playing by Silicon Valley’s rules | by Adrian Holovaty – crowdspring.co/1f87594

On the Matter of Why Bitcoin Matters – crowdspring.co/1e393YD

Four Keys to Sales Success | Inc by Howard Tullman – crowdspring.co/1fkx7V6

You Can’t Beat Habit – crowdspring.co/1dlSylX

socialmediablog

Three Long-Held Concepts Every Marketer Should Rethink | Harvard Business Review – crowdspring.co/M5TsNZ

SEO Pricing: 600+ Agencies Share Costs of Services & Pricing Models | Moz – crowdspring.co/1f86l3x

Read the rest of this post »

You Can’t Beat Habit Mike | February 3rd, 2014

I am a complex and ever-changing creature of habit. I wake up every work-day morning at 530am, am at the computer drinking my morning coffee and answering emails before 6,  starting to think seriously about lunch (and aware of gnawing stomach) at 1130, yawning for afternoon coffee at 3pm, and heading home for dinner and after-dinner work around 530. At 10pm I am watching Jon Stewart, at 1040 brushing teeth, and am in bed lights out by 11. I did stop taking the train this year, but only because I moved within walking distance of the office. I mss that, for sure but am working on replacing the regularity of the commute with a daily morning workout at home. (So far a little spotty, but starting to gel.)

There is comfort for me in this daily routine, but there is something more. Predictability. And it is precisely that predictability that helps me to maintain productivity, think clearly, generate new ideas, and maintain a very busy schedule while not exhausting myself completely. It is also that predictability that allows my team to know where I am when, and what I am probably doing, where. In fact, I argue that having a regular schedule, driven by habit and developed for efficiency can be a great boon to entrepreneurs and startup founders. You see, by developing habits and sticking to schedules business owners and managers can better manage their time, can complete more tasks, and can achieve a level of productivity that would be undermined by seat-of-pants, ad hoc, and aimless work and life schedules.

I have observed that many people in life, and many workers professionally tend to make their way through their days with no specific plan of attack, and no real structure to how or what they will accomplish that day. I tend to be a list-maker (another habit developed over time) and it is these lists that organize my day, my week, even my month. In conjunction with a fairly detailed calendar, these lists act not just as reminders for the tasks I need to accomplish, but also as a time-organization tool and as a record of what I have done. If I ever need to remind myself about a meeting I had last October, or a restaurant where I met a colleague for lunch, a quick flip through my trusty moleskin will reveal those details.

Habit is also the enemy of distraction. Entrepreneurs are surrounded by people, bright lights, flickering screens, enticing web videos, funny chain emails, and noise, noise, noise. Creating strong work and life habits can help to filter out the noise and keep one focused on the task at hand, whether it is your weekly review of sales figures (every Monday morning), your afternoon coffee (3pm, remember?), or your full-team meeting (Thursdays at 11am). If you know that you have that standing meeting starting in 10 minutes and you ned to prepare for it, you are much less likely to get caught in the tar-pit that is The Onion online edition (best headline as I write this post? “Al-Qaeda Operative Can’t Believe How Expensive Super Bowl Tickets Are.”)

Habit helps to structure and define your day and, in turn, your day’s work. By creating manageable chunks of time during the day, you can accomplish more by better focusing on specific tasks, and by limiting the amount of time you devote to any one thing, you create a framework for the day and can actually accomplish much more over time than you might if you were flitting from one task to the next.

Habits can be good (washing your hands), bad (drinking too much), or clothes (think monks), but they can also be a valuable tool for the manager or business-owner when developed and used over time. What do you do habitually? How does it help you to be more productive? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below this post.

Painting: “Old Faithful” — by Albert Bierstadt, 1830-1902

Small Business and Startups: 5 Tips For Keeping the Books Mike | January 27th, 2014

The first quarter of the business year is a great time to put in place or review your accounting and bookkeeping systems. Every entrepreneur needs to have a bit of the comptroller in their personality, but relatively few have the skills or patience to learn them. Enter the accounting team: you, your bookkeeper, your CPA, and (sometimes) your tax specialist.Rat

The basics are pretty simple: you need to pay vendors, bill customers, make deposits, and pay your taxes. Beyond that it starts to get pretty complex, pretty quickly. The best way for small business owners and startup entrepreneurs to deal with that complexity is through careful planning, detailed documentation, and careful organization. The worst thing a business owner can do is to let those bills and invoices, pile up which can not only make things crazy difficult when tax time comes around, but can also serve to kill your cash flow and, ultimately, your ability to stay on business.

With the right people in place and the right tools at hand, accounting tasks can become relatively simple and the commitment of your time surprisingly minimal. Here are 5 things to keep in mind when planning for a solid accounting and bookkeeping strategy:

1. Know your accountant.
Larger companies have larger accounting departments, and will often have a CFO, a controller (aka ‘comptroller’), accountants, and bookkeepers on staff to handle the flow of financial data and oversee the quality of reporting. Often these companies will engage an outside tax accountant who specializes in the arcane details of the IRS as well as state departments of revenue or taxation. Small businesses are more likely to hire an outside accountant who is versed in managing books, creating reporting systems, and preparing corporate taxes. Smaller accounting firms tend to be populated with these jack-of-all-trades type accountants and will meet the needs of most small businesses. High-growth startups and mid-size companies will also often outsource accounting, but will usually have at least two accountants on the team, a generalist as well as a tax specialist. A good accountant will not just keep your books in order and your business on the right side of the tax code, but can and should also act as a trusted advisor, someone who can answer your questions, assist with your business strategy, and help you grow and develop your company over time. Where to find this person? My best advice is to ask business associates, friends, or even your attorney. Referrals are the best way to find the right match and to enter the relationship with some certainty and a reasonable level of trust.

2. Keeping the books.
A great bookkeeper is not the same as an accountant and many businesses hire their bookkeeper with some simple goals in mind: keep me organized, get my bills paid, and get me prepared for the work that will be handed to the accountant. Typically bookkeepers are much less expensive than CPAs and can be trusted to record and organize your day-to-day transactions, keep your bank accounts balanced, produce simple reports, and assist with keeping your financial records in order. Many small businesses will use an outside bookkeeper, paid hourly, who is in the office on a regular basis to handle all entries, pay all the bills, and manage invoicing and receivables. Having help with this aspect of managing a small company can be indispensable, and the time it can free for a busy manager, invaluable.

3. Stay organized.
Any business from the smallest of hot dog stands to the largest of public companies creates data. Sales data, inventory data, employee data, customer data… the list is endless. And like any kind of data, if it is not organized and accessible it is completely useless. With accounting data this is doubly-true and the speed at which a small business can fall behind can be breathtaking. Even a few weeks of unrecorded sales transactions, or a month of un-mailed invoices can quickly swamp a small business, destroy cash flow, and put it out of business faster than you can spell IRS. Set up a filing system, keep bills organized and paid on time, be sure customer invoices go out promptly, and put systems in place that will force you to do these things in a disciplined and methodical way. A strong bookkeeper will be worth their weight in gold if they can help you develop the systems you’ll need between now and tax-time 2014. Unfortunately it’s too late for 2013; if you’re not already organized with last year’s accounting, you have some troubles that this blog post will be unable to help you with!

Read the rest of this post »

Twitter Link Roundup #209 – Small Business, Startups, Innovation, Social Media, Design, Marketing and More Ross | January 24th, 2014

Every day on the crowdSPRING Twitter account and on my own Twitter account, I post links to posts or videos I enjoyed reading or viewing. These posts and videos are about logo design, web design, startups, entrepreneurship, small business, leadership, social media, marketing, and more! Here are some of the links that I’ve liked and shared this past week!

There was much excitement about Amazon’s announcement some time ago that they are researching delivery of packages using drones. Here’s a fun look at another Amazon delivery service – yesterday shipping.

smallbusinessblog

Small Business and Startups: Managing the I, You, We - crowdspring.co/1e4Xyih

How to use crowdsourcing for your next design project | Phoenix Business Journal – crowdspring.co/LpYkNE

startupsblog

10 Secrets to Being Happy As An Entrepreneur | Business 2 Community by Wendy Maynard – crowdspring.co/1aCijkV

Why New Features Usually Flop | Inside Intercom - crowdspring.co/1fFOTH0

Small Business and Startups: Managing the I, You, We - crowdspring.co/1e4Xyih

Valuable Tasty Trade video interview with Jason Fried of 37signals on remote work, business, & more -crowdspring.co/1dpa5tg

Report: The Collaborative Economy is a $110b market - crowdspring.co/1mlgECF

Today my startup failed - crowdspring.co/1f6O4UQ

12 Things I Want To Teach My Toddler About Work | LinkedIn -crowdspring.co/1g4i32P

Why Everything I Thought I Knew About Churn Is Wrong - crowdspring.co/1aEBRFn

Life Above and Beyond the Fold | Moz - crowdspring.co/LIKmGQ

Good reminder from @dhh to discourage specialization on teams (especially smaller teams) -crowdspring.co/1fFL9Fz

How to use crowdsourcing for your next design project | Phoenix Business Journal – crowdspring.co/LpYkNE

socialmediablog

Crushed, crashed and battery operated: 26 clever bus ads - crowdspring.co/1dvCygW

Testing the Accuracy of Visitor Data from Alexa, Compete, Google Trends, Doubleclick & Quantcast | Moz – crowdspring.co/1dYibd8

The Old Spice marketing team continues to impress with their creativity - crowdspring.co/1egvCFu

Read the rest of this post »

Small Business and Startups: Managing the I, You, We Mike | January 20th, 2014

The smallest of small businesses are operated by one or two people, and are wildly efficient. When one are operating a business out of your kitchen or spare bedroom, she tends to be master of all domains, have everything within reach, and gets done whatever it is that needs to be done. However, as soon as a business moves from the realm of “the one” it becomes necessary to change not just the approach in how things get done, but also the language and approach surrounding activities. Great managers tend to use the pronouns “we,” “you” and “us”  a great deal of the time and their approach de-emphasizes (though never completely removes) the “I” and the “me.”

To build, manage, and get the most out of teams, leaders need to find balance in how they communicate with the team and how they operate personally and this starts with language. The pronouns used signal a manager’s attitude and approach go a long way to building great teams. This is not to say that leaders should never use “I” or should always avoid the “me.” Startup founders, departmental managers, CEOs and anyone else with direct responsibility for an organization large or small have certain traits in common. Necessary to a management role is a strong and healthy regard for one’s self and a (hopefully) benevolent egocentrism that drives ambition and fuels leadership. A large part of the success a great manager fuels is built around their own personal drive and desire for glory. But that drive, that ambition can not exist in a vacuum; without meaningful accomplishments, personal glory can never be achieved, and without the impulse to achieve, very little can be accomplished.

Read the rest of this post »

Twitter Link Roundup #208 – Small Business, Startups, Innovation, Social Media, Design, Marketing and More Ross | January 17th, 2014

Every day on the crowdSPRING Twitter account and on my own Twitter account, I post links to posts or videos I enjoyed reading or viewing. These posts and videos are about logo design, web design, startups, entrepreneurship, small business, leadership, social media, marketing, and more! Here are some of the links that I’ve liked and shared this past week!

The video above is a terrific anti-speeding ad from New Zealand.

smallbusinessblog

Four Important Small Business Insights: Marketing in 2014 – crowdspring.co/1d0lOBF

What can replace Facebook for small business? | by Becky McCray – crowdspring.co/1cXKpqQ

Small Business and Startups: Thinking About Business Plans (again) – crowdspring.co/1cdV3pS

Empower Your Small Business: 2014 marketing insights, biz plans, resolutions, content marketing – crowdspring.co/1fyj2Z1

The Importance of Transactional Emails for Small Business – crowdspring.co/L1YQ46

Should a Company Create a Separate Customer Service Twitter Handle? – crowdspring.co/1eJmGfD

5 Rules For Awesome Impromptu Web Analysis – crowdspring.co/1aiDVmr

startupsblog

2013. Hard Lessons Learned. | Ben Milne – crowdspring.co/1cXPaR9

Four Important Small Business Insights: Marketing in 2014 – crowdspring.co/1d0lOBF

15 Tech Trends That Will Define 2014, Selected By Frog | Co.Design – crowdspring.co/1dx4t4F

Small Business and Startups: Thinking About Business Plans (again) – crowdspring.co/1cdV3pS

Convert shortcomings into advantages without lying – crowdspring.co/1eJqbCJ

“Fundamental difference between entrepreneurs & con artists is con artists know fantasies they’re selling are lies” crowdspring.co/1d1Jv9v

Growth Hacking Is Bull – crowdspring.co/L1Z1wv

5 Rules For Awesome Impromptu Web Analysis – crowdspring.co/1aiDVmr

Keith Rabois on the Role of a COO, How to Hire and Why Transparency Matters – crowdspring.co/1col3yU

Should a Company Create a Separate Customer Service Twitter Handle? – crowdspring.co/1eJmGfD

Lessons From 4 Failed Start-ups – crowdspring.co/1conMZ9

“Looking historically at the trends in… 2014 and beyond, the tech market is vibrant and healthy.” crowdspring.co/L76cU1

socialmediablog

Seven best practice tips for online video in 2014 | Econsultancy – crowdspring.co/1cW7Fp3

5 Massive Advertising Campaign Wars Between Rival Brands – crowdspring.co/1dx93zY

Native advertising: 12 fascinating examples of good and bad practice | Econsultancy – crowdspring.co/1cW7VVb

Read the rest of this post »

Four Important Small Business Insights – Marketing in 2014 Ross | January 14th, 2014

ExactTarget-spend

A new 2014 State of Marketing Report from ExactTarget presents the results of a survey taken by approximately 2,000 marketing managers. The report contains four important insights for small businesses and startups:

1. Social remains an interesting but unproven channel. Forty-six percent of marketers claim that social is core to their business, but only 34 percent said their social marketing efforts were currently producing a return on their investment. This finding is consistent with results reported in other studies.

Exacttarget-roi

2. Email is, for many, the most important marketing channel. A large majority of marketers – 68 percent – say that email marketing is core to their business and is the best strategy to increase sales. This is not surprising. one-to-one marketing has proven to be effective for many. In fact, 57 percent of marketers plan to increase the number of emails they send in 2014. The top performing email campaigns include loyalty, birthday, welcome, abandoned cart, and browse retargeting.

3. Conversions are king. While many marketers look at engagement rates, lifetime customer value, social activity (likes, shares, retweets), the top success metric for most marketers remains conversions.

Read the rest of this post »

Small Business and Startups: Thinking About Business Plans (again) Mike | January 13th, 2014

I am thinking about starting a new business and beginning to focus on planning, financing, marketing, launching and operating the thing. I have already done a fair amount of market research and determined that there is a demand for it, created a spreadsheet with financial projections that I am confident in, put together a bunch of notes on how I will market it, and given some serious consideration to the human capital needed to make it run. Now it’s time for me to set up some meetings with a few bankers and possible investors to get the funds in place so I can really get going.

Just kidding. crowdSPRING takes up way too much of my capacity and is still too much fun to even consider (for the moment) a new venture. But, I have been thinking a lot about what I would do differently and that would start with the business plan itself. When Ross and I launched cS we created a business plan that ran over 80 pages and a slide deck that included more than 40 slides. It worked well for us, both in process and outcome. The process of writing and re-writing the plan and the constant revisions to the Powerpoint helped us to strengthen the original idea and define for ourselves how we would operate the business. The outcome was also positive, and we were able to complete our funding in a relatively short amount of time and with a high conversion rate of potential investors.

So what would I do differently? Well to start, these 5 things:

1. Kill the 80-page plan. I want something that can be read in under 10 minutes, and supported with other materials which i will create. My business “plan” will be the equivalent of an executive summary: short, digestible, and very high level. It will contain around 10 paragraphs and be structured like an easy to read essay, with an introductory paragraph including my thesis of why this business will succeed, 3-5 supporting paragraphs (containing specifics on the the market, the revenue model, the existing and future competition and any barriers to entry, the financial projections, the marketing plan and operational objectives), and a summary re-stating the original business proposition.

2. Put the slide deck on my iPad. The people I will be pitching are busy bankers, investors, and potential teammates and I want to save the bulk of my allotted 30-40 minutes on answering their questions, defending my assumptions, and making my bid for their support. The 6 or 7 paragraphs included in the business plan document can serve as the outline for my slides, but they need to be as simple as possible. The visuals can not be cluttered and a no-bullet-point rule will be in effect. Slides are meant to backup the words the presenter is speaking rather than being read aloud to the audience. They should be designed for the small screen, on the assumption that there is no time or space for a projector and to make the entire experience intimate and personal. This is not to say that I may won’t find myself in a room of 6 or 12 people listening to the pitch with a projector attached, but the assumption is that mostly it will be one-to-one.

3. Start a blog. It is never to early to get your thoughts down on paper and establishing thought leadership in your new market will send a signal to potential stakeholders that you are serious and authoritative. The conversations you will be having can be comfortable places and if you can say to the person, “Hey, I wrote a post about that just a few weeks ago” and point them to your blog, your credibility will increase on the spot.

Read the rest of this post »

Twitter Link Roundup #207 – Small Business, Startups, Innovation, Social Media, Design, Marketing and More Ross | January 10th, 2014

nikeadvertisement

Every day on the crowdSPRING Twitter account and on my own Twitter account, I post links to posts or videos I enjoyed reading or viewing. These posts and videos are about logo design, web design, startups, entrepreneurship, small business, leadership, social media, marketing, and more! Here are some of the links that I’ve liked and shared this past week!

The image above is a very creative ad for Nike.

smallbusinessblog

New research casts doubts on the benefits of open offices. Here are 5 things you can do to avoid problems – crowdspring.co/1cDmk8z

New Years Resolutions For Small Businesses and Startups – crowdspring.co/1cC7HmZ

NSF study shows > 90% of US businesses view copyright, patent and trademark as “not important” – crowdspring.co/19TypXt

Small business and the Affordable Care Act: It’s Here! – crowdspring.co/1a00oBp

Stop Spending Time With Toxic People | Business Insider – crowdspring.co/19TACCk

“Silence is for the weak” | The Circle Blog – crowdspring.co/1iiz86r

startupsblog

Growth versus capital efficiency (good read for entrepreneurs) – crowdspring.co/1bLmEhW

New Years Resolutions For Small Businesses and Startups – crowdspring.co/1cC7HmZ

New research casts doubts on the benefits of open offices. Here are 5 things you can do to avoid problems – crowdspring.co/1cDmk8z

An awesome overview of the Chicago tech scene – crowdspring.co/1krnniz

Managing a Startup Isn’t Different – Don’t Re-invent Everything – crowdspring.co/JAZ4Od

True Leaders Focus On Leading, Not Job Titles – crowdspring.co/1lxBRLU

The Saddest SaaS Pricing Pages of the Year – crowdspring.co/1cN4ZGX

“Silence is for the weak” | The Circle Blog – crowdspring.co/1iiz86r

T-Mobile CEO: “This industry blows,” biggest carriers offer “horsesh**” | Ars Technica – crowdspring.co/1fejgUP

Stop Spending Time With Toxic People | Business Insider – crowdspring.co/19TACCk

Why 70-80% of VCs do harm | VentureLynx – crowdspring.co/1cQo8HS

Tech Angels Cross The $1Billion Mark In 2013 | TechCrunch – crowdspring.co/1fehao1

The Four Stages of Disruption | Re/code – crowdspring.co/1cN4HzJ

Amazon’s Current Employees Raise the Bar for New Hires – crowdspring.co/1fduDMI

The Dangerous Rise of “Entrepreneurship Porn” | Morra Aarons-Mele Harvard Business Review – crowdspring.co/JEtYpu

“Chicago is now ranked as one of the top ten cities in the world for starting a company” | The Economist – crowdspring.co/19TzjmX

Tech Is Hiring More Women Than Men | Business Insider – crowdspring.co/Kdalon

Five mobile predictions for 2014 | Econsultancy – crowdspring.co/KxuSor

Profiting From A Collaborative Economy | Forbes – crowdspring.co/1a1Q9wj

Why Startups Hire Their Own Lawyers | TechCrunch – crowdspring.co/1dJTHrm

To Raise Productivity, Let More Employees Work from Home | Harvard Business Review – crowdspring.co/19TzMWd

The Intersection of Intelligence and Arrogance | Management Psychology Group – crowdspring.co/KdbagV

NSF study shows > 90% of US businesses view copyright, patent and trademark as “not important” – crowdspring.co/19TypXt

Small business and the Affordable Care Act: It’s Here! – crowdspring.co/1a00oBp

socialmediablog

Six Things Every CMO Should Be Watching This Year | Forbes by David Armano – crowdspring.co/1fdtXHk

Before and After: 11 Taglines That Brands Wisely Revamped – crowdspring.co/1dJQYyh

Read the rest of this post »