Tips for Creatives to Succeed on crowdSPRING Audree | January 31st, 2011

Hello Creatives!  I’ve been hanging around cS since September of ’08 – first as a creative, then as a member of the crew. I thought I’d share a little of what I’ve learned about how to find success when participating here on cS. I was a designer, but much of this information will apply to writers as well. So let’s get to it!

PICK YOUR PROJECTS CAREFULLY

As you submit in more and more projects – you will get a feel for the ones you seem to be best at. Don’t try to make yourself something you’re not. You will learn to read a brief and sense if it’s a good fit for your style.

We do have a feature where buyers can withdraw entries from the gallery so they can better focus on the entries they are more interested in. Please do your best not to take this as an insult. If they do this, at least you know where you stand. In many ways, it’s better than being ignored. You can avoid wasting your time and move on to another project.

If you want to see if a buyer is actively involved in the project, be sure to click “Project stats” at the top right of the gallery page. You will see a breakdown of star scores and if written feedback is being provided.

EXPLAIN YOUR ENTRY

This is often the most overlooked step in posting your brilliant creative work. Explain your concept, how it can be used, and why it is a good representation of their company. Sharing the reasoning behind your design or written entry will not only help draw interest to your entry, it will often help you connect with the buyer and inspire feedback.

Engage the buyer! Encourage them to provide feedback, or ask questions. If they don’t answer – they are probably not interested. If you feel strongly about your entry, see if you can make an improvement and re-submit. It’s a chance to once again ask for any comments they might have.

SAVE IT FOR ANOTHER DAY

I know what it’s like to put your time into your creation, only to have it looked over. But what doesn’t work for one buyer may be a perfect fit for another. Save everything. You may be able to update it for use in another project some day. But make sure you withdraw it from any other projects before you post it in a new one!

KEEP IT ORIGINAL

Look out for generic logo designs.

Not only are they not allowed in logo projects, they will keep you from standing out. Do your best to avoid trends. They will be dated before you know it. If you take the time to think out of the box and put in the extra effort to provide something fresh and new – it will pay off.

LOOK AND LEARN

When a project closes, look at the designs that win and the ones that were scored high. Study them and what may have made them a success. If some are created with a technique you don’t know, Google it and learn how to do it. There are tons of free tutorials out there. We typically share 5-10 great links on Twitter every day to tutorials, inspirations and more.

You may also consider sending a PM  (Private Message) to another creative, and asking for advice. We have a community filled with fantastic talent, and so many of our awesome creatives are willing to help if you take the time to ask.

BRAND YOURSELF!

When buyers go looking for creatives to invite to their projects, the first impression they get of you is your avatar. If you want to stand out and express yourself, you need a custom image to set yourself apart. You don’t have to make it from scratch, just find a cool image that connects with you. Here is a cool one from one of our talented creatives, TinBacicDesign.  Also be sure to post sample designs in your portfolio so buyers can get a sense of your style.

BREATHE

If you find yourself frustrated by a project – withdraw and move on. You are not going to click with every buyer. Our most successful creatives know this – and use this strategy. Focus your attention and efforts on the projects that you can get something out of. Use the time here to learn and grow. Push yourself to improve and find unique solutions to each project brief. Creating should be a fulfilling experience. If it stops being fun – take a break.

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If you have any questions about these tips, or have any you would like to share with the community, please come on over to the crowdSPRING Forums.

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  • printbrat

    Thank you for these tips. As a designer who has worked in print shops my entire life (yes . . . my father was a pressman and later a shop owner so I have been in printing my entire life), this new world I am in is frustrating at times. I have always had jobs put in front of me because people came to the shop, but I was the one behind the door doing the work even though the clients didn’t know it was me. Because of the economy I have not been able to find another print shop job so I am not working in a whole new world. Anyway, thanks for the fine advice. I will take it to heart.

  • Arfin77

    hi audree
    this is very helpful and enlightening for me.
    the words that I like: KEEP IT ORIGINAL!
    and I’m very sorry to have gained previous Note (ticket) from Cs, because “Overused, Overdone Logo Concepts” and similar to other entry

    after I read your article.
    I became something new now

    thank you
    arfin

    thank you
    arfin

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