Archive for December, 2008

Happiness Is Helping

Ross | December 31st, 2008

Can you make a difference if you help just one person per day? You bet! Many of us become involved with efforts to help the environment, cancer research, and numerous other large-scale causes. Those efforts are worthy and important. Some of us help by donating money. Others help by volunteering their time. At the end […]

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Keep Things In Perspective

Ross | December 29th, 2008

It is not unusual to get bent out of shape, become angry, and to express our frustrations when things don’t go as planned. We do this when a potential client doesn’t select us for an assignment, when someone says something negative about us, our companies or people we care about, and in many more situations. […]

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Ten Practical Search Engine Marketing (SEM) Tips

Ross | December 23rd, 2008

Mike and I stated working on crowdSPRING in the summer of 2006. We incorporated the company in May 2007 and launched the crowdSPRING marketplace in May 2008. We’ve learned many important lessons along the way. In some ways, our experience is typical of other start-ups. In other ways, it is not. I want to share […]

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The Culture of Customer Service

Jerome | December 19th, 2008

Ross recently wrote a post about talking with people, not to them. When it comes to customer service, many people forget this lesson. It’s simple. Customer service is first being human. Great customer service means listening, talking with customers, fixing what doesn’t work, and saying “I’m sorry” when you did something wrong. We look up […]

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A Simple Thank You Can Be Very Powerful

Ross | December 18th, 2008

Technology has transformed the way we communicate. Email, SMS, Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, MySpace, and other forms of  communications have allowed people who would not have “met” ten years ago to develop social relationships. We get many great emails from people every day thanking us for what we do. Those emails put huge smiles on the […]

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I Was Paid To Say That But I Would Have Said It Anyway

Ross | December 16th, 2008

“Every man alone is sincere. At the entrance of a second person, hypocrisy begins.” (Ralph Waldo Emerson) This isn’t another post about Chris Brogan’s Dadomatic blog. That subject has been capably covered by others, including Scott Henderson, Jeremiah Owyang, Ben Kunz, and Chris Brogan. What this post is about: Robert Scoble asserted yesterday that it’s […]

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Most In Social Media Act Like Two Year Olds

Ross | December 15th, 2008

“There are no seven wonders of the world in the eyes of a child.  There are seven million.” (Walt Streightif) Most people involved in social media are like two year old kids. Two year old kids enjoy playing alongside other kids, but keep to themselves. After they  turn three, kids begin to have real friendships […]

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Can He Really Do Handstands?

Judson | December 12th, 2008

Oh jeez guys. I’m really nervous. In fact, I really didn’t even know what to say. But, I’m seriously happy and pumped to say that I work here now. Crazy, right?! Let me introduce myself: I’m Judson Collier, and I’m a 17 year old (yes, 17. I actually said in my application that I was […]

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Think They’ll Give Me A Pulitzer Prize For Journalism?

Ross | December 11th, 2008

Why not? Two-thirds of Americans are dissatisfied with traditional journalism. Nearly half rely on the Internet as their primary source for news. Still, most people are not prepared to throw away traditional journalism.  The vast majority – 87% of people – think that professional journalism will continue to play an important role. Some traditional journalism […]

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What Does Tribal Leadership Teach Us About Building Strong Communities and Organizations?

Ross | December 10th, 2008

Tribal Leadership: Leveraging Natural Groups to Build a Thriving Organization (by Dave Logan, John King, and Halee Fischer-Wright). Most people believe that innovation, quality and success is the product of great leadership. A ten year, 24,000 person study found that “tribes”, naturally forming groups of between 20-150 people, and not leaders, drive success in virtually all […]

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